Tough Questions Answered

A Christian Apologetics Blog

Does God Take People’s Lives? – #9 Post of 2009

Post Author: Bill Pratt

Clearly, yes He does.  Many people express shock over the fact that God took human life in the great flood or that He commanded Israel to kill Canaanites.  There are many other instances in the Bible where God either directly or indirectly takes lives.  There is no getting around this fact.  It makes us uncomfortable to read these passages in the Bible and some of us try to avoid these passages altogether.

It’s not just an Old Testament issue either.  Anybody remember Ananias and Sapphira?  Have you ever read the book of Revelation?  No, we can’t escape the reality of God taking human life by fleeing to the New Testament.

So, as Christians, how do we deal with this fact?  Is it wrong for God to take life?  Do we have to cringe every time a critic of Christianity raises this issue?  No, we don’t.  If we truly understand who God is, then we shouldn’t be surprised by the fact that He takes people’s lives.

The Bible teaches two things about God that helps us understand why He takes human life.  First, He is ultimately just.  He hates sin and evil.  God is perfect in righteousness and goodness, so the existence of sin and evil repulses Him.  As the ultimate judge of the entire universe, He must punish sin.

If God did not punish sin, then what kind of God would He be?  A God who winked and nodded at sin would be like a deranged trial judge who lets every murderer, rapist, and child molester go free, regardless of their guilt.  Is that really the God you want?  Every single person yearns for justice, and if the ultimate Being never administered it, there would be no ultimate justice.  We’ve all sinned.  If God is going to judge sin, then all people come into His court.

Many people say that they want a God who doesn’t punish sin, who is a big, cuddly, teddy bear in heaven.  But what they really mean to say is that they don’t want a God who punishes their particular sin.  As soon as they are wronged, they immediately call for justice!  They think God should let them cheat on their taxes, but they are outraged if they are ever cheated out of money.  We all want justice, so don’t believe anybody who says they don’t.

Fine, so God has to punish sin, but why does He sometimes punish sin by ending lives?  Isn’t that murder?  Isn’t God breaking the sixth commandment?  “Thou shalt not murder.”  The truth is, God created all life, and therefore it is His right to also take life.  When you couple God’s right to take life with His justice, you start to see what is going on with those “difficult” Bible passages.  In each instance in the Bible, when God ends earthy lives, He is always punishing heinous sin.  He is meting out justice to those who are reveling in evil.  As Judge and Creator of life, He is doing what only He can do.

Here are a couple other things to remember.  First, God takes every person’s life because every person dies.  The only question is when, where, and how a person dies.  These things are in God’s hands, as they should be.

Second, when God takes life, He can bring it back.  In fact, the Bible promises that we will all be given resurrected bodies.  God can bring life back, but humans cannot.  Therefore, you cannot apply the command to not murder to God.

God is just, and He must punish sin.  God creates all life, and so it is His right to take it.  If you remember these two things, then you’ll understand how to deal with God’s command to kill the Amalekites, or the great flood, or Ananias and Sapphira.  In the end, if humans weren’t constantly producing evil, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation.  Let’s take a look in the mirror instead of criticizing God for cleaning up the mess we make.


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Comments

  • http://www.nine-moons.com Seth R.

    I’ve always viewed a great deal of the “icky stuff” in the Old Testament as simply a damage control project from God.

  • Bill Pratt

    Well put, Seth.

  • Wes

    There are numerous reminders in the Bible to be ready for the end of your life. The Bible warns us that we are not guaranteed any length of life. When the end of our life comes, it will be an improvement if we are prepared. Paul touches on this idea in Philippians 1:21 and the following verses, I think. Many issues with God “taking” people’s lives may come from the idea that the end of your life is a tragedy, but it should not be if you are ready for it.

  • http://ramblingtaoist.blogspot.com The Rambling Taoist

    I see a problem with this whole line of reasoning. If God is perfect, he created all things and sin exists in the world, then God created sin and is, therefore, not perfect. Consequently, if he kills humans, then he does so capriciously and that would certainly contradict the sixth commandment.

    I realize one explanation is that God only allows sin to exist, but how can something that is supposedly perfect allow something evil to exist? Inaction is a form of action and his inaction toward evil itself is, in a manner of speaking, a way of condoning its existence.

  • Bill Pratt

    Rambling,
    God created good creatures with a good thing called “free will.” Those creatures used that good thing (free will) to commit evil. God was evidently willing to allow that to happen because He felt that a greater good would come from creating free creatures than creating only animals or humanoid robots who had no free will. Do you not think your freedom to criticize God is a good thing? Would you rather God take that from you?

    You said God is doing nothing about evil, but that’s not what Christianity teaches at all. God is doing plenty to limit evil through family, church, government, and the influence of the Holy Spirit. God is restraining evil in a number of ways. In addition, Christians believe He will ultimately quarantine all evil from good. This is what we all look forward to.

  • http://ramblingtaoist.blogspot.com The Rambling Taoist

    For a will to be free, there must be options to choose from. If there was only goodness, then there would be no choice. Since “God” supposedly created all things, then it stands to reckon that he created evil as well. But how could an entity that is purported to be perfect (unblemished) create something that is imperfect and blemished?

    You asked, “Do you not think your freedom to criticize God is a good thing? Would you rather God take that from you?” Since I do not believe there is a god, there’s no way for me to answer your query.

    You wrote, “God is doing plenty to limit evil…”. My response: He’s not doing a very good job and so I would say that it would seem he’s not as omnipotent as you seem to think.

  • Bill Pratt

    Rambling,
    God created the possiblity of evil when he created creatures like us. We, however, actualized that possiblity. So God did not create a blemished world full of sin and evil. it was good when he finished creating. Mankind introduced evil. Again, you seem to be saying that if God were perfect, he would have created a world without free creatures, but you clearly enjoy your freedom, so what would you have God do? Just pretend you believe he exists for the sake of the question.

    How could you know God is not doing a good job limiting evil? Do you have other actual worlds to compare to this one? I can imagine much worse worlds than what we live in. Much worse.

  • http://ramblingtaoist.blogspot.com The Rambling Taoist

    I realize that the presence of evil creates a real conundrum within the Christian belief system because each explanation that can be proffered ends up contradicting another one of its tenets.

    For example, it is said that God created the heavens and the earth, humankind and all other things. In essence, God is the source of all things. Since evil exists and God created everything, it stands to reason that God created evil itself.

    If one argues that God did NOT create evil, then that means he did not create everything and is not the source of all. It would mean there are other entities — wholly independent of God — who can create and sustain such things.

    But wait! This creates another problem. According to Judeo-Christian belief, before there was anything other than God, there was a void. So, if this other entity exists, it again means it was created by God and, in the end, God had an indirect hand in the creation of evil.

    If one argues that people created evil, then it would seem we’re as powerful as God because evil is powerful, dynamic and pervasive. It would also lead to the question: Why do we need God at all if we can create such powerful things completely independent of him?

    Finally, even if we were to accept the notion that God didn’t create evil, we’re still left with the conundrum that he allows it to flourish. How can the epitome of divine love allow its antithesis to exist? It’s very presence tarnishes all that it touches and, if we’re God’s children, then it would certainly tarnish and wound him.

    If God is indeed omnipotent, then he has the power to eradicate evil. The fact that he doesn’t would seem to indicate that a) he’s not truly powerful enough to defeat it or b) he gets some perverse joy out of watching evil wreak havoc on people’s lives. Both of these explanations create even more problems for the belief system as a whole.

  • Bill Pratt

    “Since evil exists and God created everything, it stands to reason that God created evil itself.”

    Evil is not a thing that exists on its own. You can’t find a blob of evil somewhere in the universe, pulsating pure evil. Evil is a lack or deprivation of the good. It is a parasite on the good. Try to imagine anything that is purely evil. You cannot. It’s like a hole in tree. Without the tree, the concept of a hole makes no sense. So when God created the world, and everything was good, humans began to degrade and pervert the good that was only there originally. Again, when God created finite creatures, he created the possiblity of evil. But it was the finite creatures who took the good things he created and perverted them. If you want to blame God for creating the possibility of evil, go ahead, but that’s quite different from saying that he directy created evil.

    “How can the epitome of divine love allow its antithesis to exist?”

    I already answered this question in a previous comment. I guess you just didn’t like the answer. Stated again, God allows evil to exist as a parasite because it is part of the package when he created free creatures. What is your alternative solution to this? What would you have God do? Would you like to voluntarily give up your freedom so that the evil you commit will stop?

    “If one argues that people created evil, then it would seem we’re as powerful as God because evil is powerful, dynamic and pervasive.”

    Once you understand that evil is a parasite of the good, you see how your statement above makes no sense. The parasite cannot live without the host. The parasite can never be greater than or equal to the host, because the host can always live without the pararsite, but the parasite needs and relies on the host to survive.

    “If God is indeed omnipotent, then he has the power to eradicate evil. The fact that he doesn’t would seem to indicate that a) he’s not truly powerful enough to defeat it or b) he gets some perverse joy out of watching evil wreak havoc on people’s lives.”

    Stated differently, since there is evil, God is either not all-powerful or he is not all-good. Both answers destroy the Christian concept of God. However, there is another answer you have not considered. Maybe God is in the process of defeating evil and will totally defeat it in the future. This is exactly what Christianity teaches. What you fail to understand is that if God defeats evil now, then you are toast. People commit evil every day, so the only way to defeat evil is to get rid of people or at least quarantine them from the good. God is acting mercifully by allowing people time to renounce evil and follow him. I, for one, do not want to see God eradicate evil today, because I think of all the people who will be separated from God forever.

  • http://ramblingtaoist.blogspot.com Trey Smith

    Evil is not a thing that exists on its own. You can’t find a blob of evil somewhere in the universe, pulsating pure evil.

    The very same thing can be said of goodness or love. In fact, for love to hold any meaning, we must understand its opposite, hate.

    So when God created the world, and everything was good, humans began to degrade and pervert the good that was only there originally.

    Sounds to me like a serious design flaw.

    If you want to blame God for creating the possibility of evil, go ahead, but that’s quite different from saying that he directy created evil.

    This is an example of basing an argument on semantics. If someone creates something that allows for a negative result, then what difference does it make in the end whether they built it to emit the negativity OR they set the stage for the negativity?

    God allows evil to exist as a parasite because it is part of the package when he created free creatures.

    But he, according to you, is THE designer. He could have chosen to design these creatures in a totally different manner. In addition, you accept as a given that free will means a particular thing, but God could have created us so it meant something totally different. By your own belief system, God can do anything. He knows no boundaries, yet in this instance, you’re applying boundaries to what he could do.

    What would you have God do?

    I don’t believe in [a] God, so you’re asking a question I can’t answer.

    What you fail to understand is that if God defeats evil now, then you are toast.

    Again, you’re placing boundaries on your own omnipotent being which, by the way, contradicts your own beliefs!! If God could cause a virgin to bear a child that defies all known knowledge of how humans physiologically come into existence, who among us is to say that he couldn’t simply zap all evil intent from our hearts?

  • Bill Pratt

    Trey,
    You said, “I don’t believe in [a] God, so you’re asking a question I can’t answer.”

    This is a cute debate trick, but it won’t work. You assumed God’s existence (at least for the sake of argument) when you made the following comments:
    “Sounds to me like a serious design flaw.”
    “If someone creates something that allows for a negative result, then what difference does it make in the end whether they built it to emit the negativity OR they set the stage for the negativity?”
    “He could have chosen to design these creatures in a totally different manner.”
    “God could have created us so it meant something totally different.”
    “If God could cause a virgin to bear a child that defies all known knowledge of how humans physiologically come into existence, who among us is to say that he couldn’t simply zap all evil intent from our hearts?”

    In fact, virtually every other thing you said assumed God’s existence, for the sake of your argument. So why is it, when I ask a simple question about what you would have God do, you refuse to assume God’s existence to answer the question? But when it serves your interests to advance an argument against God, you assume his existence?

    Come on Trey. Just answer the questions and quit acting like you’re in high school debate class.

    Oh, and by the way, I don’t believe God can do anything. No serious Christian believes that. God can only do what is actually possible. It is not actually possible to “zap all evil intent from our hearts” while still having us be free creatures (creatures who can either choose to follow God or not to follow God). What’s really ironic is that you would hate it if there really was a God who zapped your evil intent, but you love to wag your finger at Christians because God doesn’t do the very thing you don’t want him to do. Very strange.

  • http://ramblingtaoist.blogspot.com The Rambling Taoist

    In fact, virtually every other thing you said assumed God’s existence, for the sake of your argument. So why is it, when I ask a simple question about what you would have God do, you refuse to assume God’s existence to answer the question? But when it serves your interests to advance an argument against God, you assume his existence?

    IF I believed in God, I would not be so arrogant to presume that I could tell him what to do or even state what he would do because that, in essence, would be playing God.

    God can only do what is actually possible.

    That’s a quite little statement, but the problem is that neither you nor I know what is actually possible for the creator of the universe!! A virgin giving birth to a son would not seem actually possible, but, according to your beliefs, it happened. Bringing a dead person back to life AND raising him into the heavens would not seem actually possible, but again, according to your beliefs, it happened.

    So, despite the fact that you don’t think zapping evil intents from a person’s heart is possible — when you consider the many miraculous things you believe God has done — there’s no reason whatsoever to think that this would not be possible as well.

    In fact, it’s not that much different than the immaculate conception. In that particular instance, God put something inside of a person that wasn’t there before. If God can put something in, it stands to reason he could remove something.

  • Bill Pratt

    Rambling,
    I should have been more precise when I said God can only do what is possible. I meant that he can only do what is logically possible. Virgin births are logically possible, but saying that a woman is both a virgin and not a virgin at the same time and in the same sense would be logically impossible. God cannot do what is logically impossible, and it is logically impossible for God to create beings whom he wants to be able to choose or reject him, and at the same time take away all of their intent to reject him. If he takes away their choices to reject him, then they are not beings who can reject him.

    If you think God could have created beings who can freely choose or reject him, but also zap all the evil from their heart (which includes rejecting God), then tell us how.

  • kay

    I don’t know much about the Bible, but I have learned that God created everything, and it was all good. Satan wanted to be like God so he got mad and left the heavens. That is where evil started. Then he was successful in tempting Eve and Adam. That is how all this evil and sin got started. God continued to allow it to give us a choice, as someone already said. How would God know if we truly loved Him, if we did not choose to love Him. There must be a choice. I feel sorry for people that don’t believe. What is the point of life? How useless if there is not the hope of eternal life. Seems someone who has knowledge of the Bible would see that we are living in the endtimes. There is not much time left to make a decision. Oh, it may be hundreds of years down the road, but what about children and grandchildren of an unbeliever????? They need to be taught so they can make a decision as to love and obey God or not. It is our choice.

  • kay

    Back to the original question of does God take lives.
    He took my only child at age 7. I have struggled with why. Never was mad at God. Always felt it was to punish me. Occasionally I hope maybe it was to get my attention. Whatever the reason, it does happen.

  • King Solomon

    God does punish in many way those who rape, harass punish the abuse children and adults.

    He takes money from those who love money first about him and protect the abusers.

    Madoff is an example how God used to punish perpetrators persecutors in Las Vegas. Who tormented persecuted punish victims of religious sex crimes at the Temple.

    Just google the name Zissa Ramani

  • Mike

    The question to me is not “Does god take peoples lives.” Mr. Author (sorry didnt see your name) answers that question in his/her first sentence. The question is why does god give us the commandment not to murder…. then commands us to murder. King david might be most famous for what act? His murdering of goliath. How many times has king david slain men for various things? There are several times in OT that god commanded killings.

  • Bill Pratt

    Mike,
    Can you not tell the difference between an act of killing during a war and an individual act of murder? When God sanctioned the killing of people in the Old Testament, it was always in the context of the nation of Israel and the judgment of other nations for their wickedness. Sometimes God used the nation of Israel to render his judgment against those who perpetrated evil. This was a unique time in history that has come and gone.

    God bless,
    Bill

  • Jeff

    This is funny stuff. Do you really think that you can keep spinning all of these plates and not have one of em fall to the ground? The arguements, intanglements, rhetoric, etc… is really silly. Because God already knows that you know who He is and how He is. Why all the song and dance? I mean really. Are you trying to impress someone? You don’t impress God with these things. Or are you just trying to keep yourself tricked? I’m by NO means looking down on you because we ALL do the same stuff with God. Just be honest!!

  • http://www.rationallychristian.blogspot.com Joel

    Awesome article! Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into this wonderful resource! I have just started an apologetic website and would love to get some feedback from you and your readers. If you could take the time to look at it that would be great. http://www.rationallychristian.blogspot.com

    PS My first article is on the historical Jesus based on evidence from 1st and 2nd century writers including many non-Christian sources.

  • Bill Pratt

    Joel,
    Thanks for the kind words. Welcome to the world of blogging! The more voices we have proclaiming the rational reasons to believe Christianity is true, the better. I wish you all the best.

    God bless,
    Bill

  • Tom

    Good Article but I think it avoids the hardest questions around God killing people, namely killing the most innocent among us: unborn, several weeks old etc…

    I’ve heard the argument in the past that since God created the universe it is within his domain to take any life at anytime for any reason. Additionally all people are born with original sin, so no one is truly innocent. Logically this makes sense. Being a Christian I can accept the answer, but it is certainly a hard pill to swallow. Further it does *not* give the person the ability to know God. What is the fate of these people who never got the choice to know God?

  • Bill Pratt

    Tom,
    I believe that any person who dies before they can know God goes to heaven to spend eternity with God. Also, remember that the reason that most of the unborn die is because of human sin. We are directly responsible for the vast majority of these deaths.

    Thanks for your comment,
    Bill

  • DiscipleoftheWord

    Bill,
    Bill Pratt says: “I believe that any person who dies before they can know God goes to heaven to spend eternity with God.”

    I’m not doubting the fact that you believe this, but how do you harmonize this with John Chapter 1, 3, 5.6.7,10, 17 ..etc,etc, or any of the other books whereas a belief in God and the Son of God are absolute imperatives in the redemptive design of salvation?
    Have you really filtered this faith presupposition through what the entire tenor of scripture teaches on the subject?
    I’ve seen you say this in other ways in other post; you assert it as a dogma of certainty.
    But you do not supply a coherent support for your claim.
    To suggest this is to say that all atheists who in claiming not to believe in God, who do in essence not “know God”, will be saved after death.
    Many false religions believe in a deity or many deities’ but not the God of scripture, would your assertion include them as well.
    How do you square this with “Salvation by Grace alone” and “Justification by faith alone” ?
    I can appreciate your nobleness , but what you are preaching is universalism which the Bible does not support.

  • DiscipleoftheWord

    @The Rambling Taoist

    You have yet to show how Bills proposition that “God Kills” is unscriptural.
    You have not shown what the problem is.
    How do you establish your premise that “God is perfect, he created all things and sin exists in the world, then God created sin and is, therefore, not perfect.”
    What is perfect in your premise? And what is the meaning of “sin” in your challenge?
    In order to make this a real and rational objection, you must first establish the premise that for God to be sovereign it would make him the author of sin.
    Second, you must establish the premise that for God to be the author of sin would contradict biblical teaching, or Christianity.
    You must have coherent and relevant definitions for all the words and expressions involved, such as “God,” “Perfect” and “sin.” If you fail to do any of this, then there is logically no objection for Bill or me to answer.

  • Bill Pratt

    Hi Greg,
    My comment was in the context of the aborted unborn, not adult atheists. I am most certainly not a universalist. I think there are passages in the Bible that point toward an age of accountability. I’m sure you know about them, so I won’t bother quoting verses.

    Thanks,
    BP

  • DiscipleoftheWord

    Bill Pratt says: “I believe that any person who dies before they can know God goes to heaven to spend eternity with God.”

    I don’t believe there is any ambiguity in your statement, you placed no context or age on the “any person” in your cliam…

    I think you said what you meant and meant what you said.

    And No…I do not know about “age of accountability” verses…please humor and me sight your passages.

  • Bill Pratt

    Just read the comment above that I was responding to. The questioner was concerned about aborted babies. That sets the context of my statement. I did not feel the need to clarify that in my comment as it was obvious to those following the thread at the time.

  • DiscipleoftheWord

    Bill Pratt says: Just read the comment above that I was responding to. The questioner was concerned about aborted babies. That sets the context of my statement. I did not feel the need to clarify that in my comment as it was obvious to those following the thread at the time.
    I can see why might that claim in context in this instance.

    But then you go one to make a further cliam;
    Bill Pratt says: I think there are passages in the Bible that point toward an age of accountability.

    And again I ask you to support your claim, “I think” is not supporting evidence for a claim.

  • Matthew Bell

    I’m sorry Bill, that you are being attacked by Pharisees & Skeptics alike here. That should encourage you that you got it about right. I appreciated your article. You were right to challenge in the follow up comments, “what other world should God have created?” I haven’t heard a good answer to that one yet.

    Should God have created a world with free, creating, choosing creatures like us at all? At least then there’s no possibliity of evil. But then there’s no possiblity of anything, and even with evil in the world there is still good, & beauty & potential & love. Beside the sufferings of my life there is always goodness even when I don’t see it & feel overwhelmed. I’m not sure who said about life, “If you expect perfection or nothing, you will always get nothing.”

    Someone else has said, “It’s not that we don’t believe in God, it’s just that we don’t like Him.”

    For those who want to attack God for the way the world is, you can take some consolation about the fact that, in the Christian story, when He walked here we tortured & killed Him – got our own back!! Take that God!

    What trully amazes me is that instead of not creating, or simply destroying creation, He took responsibility for it, took our evil upon Himself, entered into this suffereing & suffered (still suffers I believe) with us in Christ, with a view to what will be.

    I cannot say that I understand the depth of it all, or tell a person “why” things are the way they are. I rarely answer everyone’s objections adequately, if at all. I acknowledge my failure to live up to even my own ideals. I can say that I need God, I need Grace, I need meaning in my life – my attempts not to believe have always come back to this.

    I will also say, God loves you, Jesus died for your sins, to give you a future & a hope.

  • saint_sinner

    Is it proper to say that that God also is responsible on how one’s life is to be taken if God is the one who takes life? (e.g. accidents, suicide, sickness, murder etc.)

  • Don Sciba

    I believe God takes earthly lives but He never extinguishes a person’s spirit, which lives forever. The taken simply enter a new sphere – Heaven or Hell. In Heaven the person lives eternally with God and in Hell the person lives in eternal separation from God. So in this view there is no death.

  • newtothis2012

    This is the type of religious rhetoric that makes more and more people turn to atheism. There is so much contradiction and lack of sensibility in this article that it makes me want to puke.

    The Bible clearly states “the wages sin pays is death.” Death was never a part of God’s plan. Death only came into play after the first human pair sinned. Furthermore, you referenced “The Bible teaches two things about God that helps us understand why He takes human life. First, He is ultimately just. He hates sin and evil. God is perfect in righteousness and goodness, so the existence of sin and evil repulses Him. As the ultimate judge of the entire universe, He must punish sin.” So, when a 3 year old is raped, beaten, and murdered, is that God’s punishment upon him/her? You also stated, In each instance in the Bible, when God ends earthy lives, He is always punishing heinous sin. He is meting out justice to those who are reveling in evil. As Judge and Creator of life, He is doing what only He can do. God takes every person’s life because every person dies. The only question is when, where, and how a person dies. These things are in God’s hands, as they should be.”” Let’s see, when a mother carries a child for 9months and it dies shortly after birth, what “heinous sin” is that innocent baby being punished for? Also, the 3,000 people who were MURDERED on 9/11, what “heinous sin” are they guilty of that GOD USED TERRORISTS TO KILL THEM AND MAKE THEIR FAMILIES GRIEVE THEIR LOSS FOR A LIFETIME?????

    You said “how a person dies is in God’s hands.” You know, I never knew God causes people to murder. I was unaware that He is responsible for sickness and other ailments that takes our loved ones away from us. Can you show me scriptural support of this? In fact, the Bible I read says that Satan the Devil is behind the atrocities and “heinous” acts we see today NOT God. Or, maybe you’re saying the Devil and God are partners in this “plan” of Gods to take lives.

    When God commanded killings in the OT, yes it was punishment against those who were thumbing their noses at Him. To say the death of a baby who is only weeks old is being punished for sin is a sin within itself.

    If God sets a time for us to die, then why is it that no one just drops dead in the middle of a sentence from natural causes? Why is it that every death is a result of sickness or crime? When an individual puts a gun to their head and blows their brains out, you really think it was God’s appointed time?

    At James 1:14 the Bible states ” When under trial, let no one say: “I am being tried by God.” For with evil things God cannot be tried nor does he himself try anyone. ” GOD DOES NOT USE EVIL TO CARRY OUT HIS PURPOSES.

  • newtothis2012

    Additionally, it’s disturbing you wrote an entire blog with no scriptural evidence to support it.

  • Rebekah

    You said “GOD DOES NOT USE EVIL TO CARRY OUT HIS PURPOSES.” and just before that you said “When God commanded killings(are these holy and not evil?) in the OT, yes it was punishment(again,this is good?) against those who were thumbing their noses at Him.”

    I guess the universal question that needs to be answered is- What is evil? If it is the absence of good, then anything with pain or suffering should be considered evil right? Therefore, your above qoutes contradict one another.

    Also, If evil is the absence of good, then what about spanking? The bible teaches us not to “spare the rod” and one who “loves their child is careful to discipline them (Proverbs 13:24)”. Discipline in itself is painful. Removing something that is desired (fleshly) can be considered “crucifing the flesh” which indicates that it is painful or suffering. If God speaks through Solomon to let us know we should spank our kids, isn’t God teaching to punish and inflict pain (evil, lack of good) on our children.

    Yes, I understand this spanking is done in love; to promote what is good, and any removing of sin in our lives by God is done out of love for us because in the end we will be better off. So again I say, What is EVIL? And, What is GOOD? Are Nations considered EVIL when they go to war to murder hundreds or thousands of men that have been inflicting pain or suffering on others? Are those very nations going to war not inflicting pain or suffering on their enemies and families by killing them? Just reading between the lines.

    And…. how does commiting evil remove evil? Examples: Killing bad people that killed people(wars). An eye for an eye? Revenge?

    Thank you for your thoughts

  • Andrew

    Why do You write “God is taking human lives” rather than “God kills people”? What is the difference if any? Look out! I am not an englishmen nor american.

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